Domestic Affairs

Last Word: Max Baer in Chicago

Chicago, 1932. The night before he would knock Ernie Schaaf unconscious, the second time a fighter would die from one of Max’s blows. We were standing at the bar.

The Acceleration of History

The core liberal conviction about the Supreme Court still rings true: it is most constructive when power is used to vindicate the rights of beleaguered minorities.

Embryos under the Microscope

In her new book, Jane Maienschein lays out the history of embryonic science—going back to Aristotle—hoping to answer an old question: When does a human life begin?

Barney Frank: A Life in Politics

Amusing and engaging, Barney Frank's stories (from sixteen terms in Congress) tell what kinds of “inside politicking” informed the presidencies of LBJ through Obama.

An Unlikely Union

Paul Moses's history of Irish-Italian relations in 19th century New York delves into the causes for "race war" between the immigrant groups and how they overcame it.

Letters | Contraception, Russia, Amtrak

Readers continue the conversation on the morality of contraception in 2015 and how Europe is handling its two most important crises and America its defunct railways.

Charleston & the Politics of Evasion

Right away, anyone who wants to discuss the implications of the shooting is scolded for “politicizing a tragedy.” Thus debate is delayed until the urgency passes.

Catholicism & the Environment

Suggested reading from Commonweal—articles, editorials, and blog posts—in light of Pope Francis's encyclical on the environment, 'Laudato Si'.'

Hillary Clinton & the Art of Jujitsu

Hillary Clinton’s foes cast her as the candidate of the past, but it's the GOP, she insists, whose ideas come from long ago. Will voters see her in a new light?

Valuing the Family

What Beau Biden's funeral brought home is that the feelings nearly all of us -- left, right, and center -- have about family bonds transcend day-to-day arguments.

Too Much Sunshine?

Transparency has brought not openness but paralysis; the ability of legislative bodies to do their job requires a closed door behind which compromise can be reached.

Our Kids

The pattern of income inequality is more than a social problem, Robert Putnam says; it's a social tragedy, most devastating in the lives of poor American children.
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Book Reviews

An Unlikely Union

June 25, 2015 | 4 comments

Our Kids

June 1, 2015 | 0 comments

Kill Chain

May 18, 2015 | 1 comment

The Republic of Imagination

May 14, 2015 | 0 comments

Beyond the Abortion Wars

May 4, 2015 | 2 comments