Cromwell the Humanitarian

The series presents a view of medieval Catholicism as the realm of cranks and fanatics, while Thomas Cromwell is shown as distinctly rational and reasonable.

The Coup at Catholic University

Peter Mitchell's take on Charles Curran and the "dissident theologian" strike at Catholic University in 1967 presents a conspiracy so big it's literally incredible.

Letter from Rome

After news of secret visit with Kim Davis, could the affection that Pope Francis generated with his visit to the United States last week vanish in a cloud of smoke?
Workers in an electronics factory in Shenzhen, China.

Stuck in the Mire

Why higher levels of manufacturing employment are no longer enough to turn economically developing countries into developed countries.

Letters | Women, Merton, Presumption

Readers write to petition for women writers, praise Luke Timothy Johnson's essay on Thomas Merton, take issue with Andrew Bacevich, and clarify education goals.

The Love of God

For Jon D. Levenson, the main form that the love of God in Judaism takes—and, by extension, the form that mature adult love ought to take—is covenantal love.

The Catholic Church & Argentina's Dirty War

Gustavo Morello, SJ, offers an incisive and balanced assessment of disparate Catholics and the roles they played in Argentina’s nightmare.

Religion Booknotes

The strangeness of Freeman’s title commands attention; Kaplan constructs a microhistory of religious conflict; Lipton presents a learned study; Manseau on diversity.

Poems | 'A Lot of Ways' & Two Other Poems

There are a lot of ways to love the world, / be loved by it. Start with the sounds / of it: cello suite, hum of sander. ...

Poems | 'Believe' & 'Place'

Yes, I can be there / enclosed in my dark skin / wanting everything / my eyes can reach / not always available / to the length of my arms. ...

Pope Francis's U.S. Visit

Pope Francis departed for Rome from Philadelphia Sunday night, after spending five eventful days in the United States. We can expect clergy, politicians, writers,...

Last Word: A Smiling Skeptic

Does Montaigne resemble the contemporary essayist who writes about faith? The short answer is that he does not—at least not in easily recognizable ways.
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