Movies

'Effie Gray' & 'Cinderella'

Emma Thompson has descried fairy-tale possibilities in the facts of Effie Gray's story; Kenneth Branagh does moderately well with an expedient "Cinderella."

'It Follows' & '71'

The resonances of "It Follows" are varied and strange, touching on subtexts sexual, ethical, and sociological. The horrors in " '71" are frightening for being true.

Leviathan

Feeling emotionally robust, moviegoer? You’d better be if you intend to see 'Leviathan,' the acclaimed Golden Globe winner and Oscar nominee for best foreign film.

Mr. Turner

Most biopics try to penetrate the mystery of what makes a great artist, but 'Mr. Turner' deliberately preserves that mystery, and seals it into our hearts and minds.

'American Sniper'

Clint Eastwood's 'American Sniper' has provoked criticism from both right and left. It's awash in patriotic spirit, it glorifies war. It's also a pretty bad movie.

'Selma'

'Selma' dramatizes one moment in the civil-rights movement when Martin Luther King, wracked by doubts and intimations of mortality, could have put his goals on hold.

'Unbroken' & 'The Imitation Game'

One movie too obviously geared to celebrate a Triumph of the Human Spirit; another whose writing and acting skillfully adduce the nature of the hero's character.

'The Babadook'

Jennifer Kent’s "The Babadook" is a horror film that abjures cheap thrills and builds its terrors securely atop a base of all-too-familiar human pain.

'Birdman'

Alejandro González Iñárritu has made something that looks and feels unique, with a cast that works with such ensemble perfection I hesitate to single anyone out.

'Rosewater' & 'Nightcrawler'

"Rosewater"—set in an Iranian prison—is painful, poignant, at times funny and humanizing. "Nightcrawler"—a monster movie that wants to be a social indictment—isn't.

'Listen Up Philip'

The reduction of character and motive to diagrammable banalities seems of a piece with this film’s lack of interest in creating anything resembling human emotion.

'Gone Girl'

A mystery story, a portrait of marriage, and—more than anything else—a satire on big American expectations.
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