Movies

Deluge & Delusion

Darren Aronofsky, a master of misery, is very much in his element in 'Noah' as he envisions the sinful self-destruction of nearly the whole damned human race.

Treacle

The evangelistic fervor of its producers is evident throughout 'Son of God,' but so is bombastic filmmaking lacking in any nuance or freshness of approach.

The Master

Philip Seymour Hoffman had the greatest range of any character actor of his generation, and his filmography is stupendous in both its length and its variety.

Bottled-Up Yearning

'The Invisible Woman' has tact but lacks Dickensian bustle and comedy; 'Gloria' depicts a woman whose way of surviving is to live on the fly.

A Soulless Soul Mate

'Her' focuses on emotional anxieties, asking what happens when companionship and intimacy itself are outsourced to a rapidly evolving machine. What happens to us?

The Art of the Con

No moviemaker since Sturges has made the din of recrimination as funny as Russell does in 'American Hustle,' while Scorcese dazzles though 'Wolf' goes nowhere.

Odd Couples

Judi Dench radiates from a still center, and Emma Thompson confirms that she is the best movie actress in the English-speaking world.

Seeing as God Sees

Karen Kilby, Luke Timothy Johnson, and Bernard G. Prusak reassess Terrence Malick's 'The Tree of Life.'

What Is He Up To?

Our problems with 'The Tree of Life' are likewise problems with Malick’s peculiar cinematic language.

'The Use of Cinema to Do Theology'

There is no mistaking Malick’s theological intentions, nor for that matter the academic credentials he possesses to make such an effort.

'How All Things Fit Together'

One way of understanding Malick's film is as an attempt to present a vision of, precisely, everything.

All At Sea

'Captain Phillips' is thoughtful and electrifyingly exciting; 'All Is Lost' is Sisyphean hopelessness but also a Sisyphean defiance.
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