Seeing as God Sees

Karen Kilby, Luke Timothy Johnson, and Bernard G. Prusak reassess Terrence Malick's 'The Tree of Life.'

What Is He Up To?

Our problems with 'The Tree of Life' are likewise problems with Malick’s peculiar cinematic language.

'The Use of Cinema to Do Theology'

There is no mistaking Malick’s theological intentions, nor for that matter the academic credentials he possesses to make such an effort.

'How All Things Fit Together'

One way of understanding Malick's film is as an attempt to present a vision of, precisely, everything.

All At Sea

'Captain Phillips' is thoughtful and electrifyingly exciting; 'All Is Lost' is Sisyphean hopelessness but also a Sisyphean defiance.

An Everyday Nightmare

In this film slavery creates a hell in which everyone burns—blacks and whites, men and women, victims and victimizers, the well-intentioned and the malevolent.


As tearjerker banalities and bromides play out, on the visual side 'Gravity' compensates with a display of nearly overwhelming beauty and power.


'Prisoners' is a very good movie -- but not the minor masterpiece it should have been.

Fearsome Correctives

John Ponsoldt avoids triteness and makes you care; Cate Blanchett's operatic and annihilating performance makes Woody Allen's newest film a keeper.

Recording Angel with a Camera

Among the virtues of Ryan Coogler's film "Fruitvale Station" is the way he shows how numerous definitions of the word "tragedy" may apply.

Words & Deeds

'Hannah Arendt' offers an immersion in the world of postwar New York intellectuals; 'A Hijacking' portrays the travails of a cargo ship set upon by Somali pirates.
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