Books

The Republic of Imagination

Iranian author Azar Nafiri defends the value of canonical American literature—its imagination and humanity—against Common Core, market analyses, and Babbitt.

An Interview with Kirstin Valdez Quade

The award-winning author of the story collection 'Night at the Fiestas' talks about her influences, the importance of empathy in fiction, and washing altar cloths.

Beyond the Abortion Wars

Charles Camosy believes we are “on the verge of a new moment in the abortion debate," politically capable of compromise. But has he misunderstood Catholic teaching?

Letters | Teaching prisoners, seminarians & ourselves

Shortsighted Kudos to Robert Cowan for saying that the objections that scuttled Governor Andrew Cuomo’s plan to pay for college classes for prison inmates...

Blackballed

Pinckney's short history deals with basic things—Reconstruction, Ku Klux Klan terrorism, crude political machinations like Plessy v Ferguson—white people can forget.

The Young T.E. Lawrence

The pro-British kings archeologist-turned-spy-turned-colonel T.E. Lawrence helped establish in Arabia, Iraq, and Transjordan made "Arab unity" a "madman's notion."

Life After Faith

Is humanity better or worse off believing in the sacred? Kitcher has not provided new reasons for declaring the death of God, but he certainly makes it seem foolish.

Loitering

It might be tempting to call D’Ambrosio’s essays confessions. But he rejects that label. The self of his essays is “more like a perspective, an angle of vision..."

The Liberal Arts vs. Neoliberalism

Deresiewicz not only critiques the idea that college education is about learning marketable skills; he also revives the old quest for meaning, self, and soul.

Medieval Christianity

This integrative, enjoyable "book for beginners" still may hold surprises for scholars: nuns absolving sins, petitioners humiliating saints, a woman pope, and more.

Moral Agents

Mailer, Trilling, Macdonald, Kazin, Maxwell, Bellow, Auden, O'Hara—men with public moral concerns, who seized power to shape American literature. But who were they?

There's Something I Want You to Do: Stories

Baxter reads fiction to “see bad stuff happening.” He writes characters who get into serious trouble, and face their own "human wreckage" at someone else's request.
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Book Reviews

An Unlikely Union

June 25, 2015 | 3 comments

Our Kids

June 1, 2015 | 0 comments

Why the Romantics Matter

June 1, 2015 | 0 comments

Kill Chain

May 18, 2015 | 1 comment