Reconstruction and Clarification (Update)

In my reflection on Pope Francis' interview with Father Spadaro, I remarked that it be best interpreted under the genre of "conversation," rather than "interview." The same was even more true of the "interview" with Signore Scalfari. But, even at its first appearance, I wondered how it had been recorded by Scalfari – did he bring an aide? (clearly not); did he use a recorder? (none was mentioned); is he adept at short hand? (even while discoursing on the "fabric of being").

Now it appears that it was not recorded at all, but reconstructed after the fact by the octagenarian (though very astute) editor.

John Page, in a comment below, called our attention to the new information. Since his comment is on an old post, I provide the link here.

I confess to finding the modus procedendi rather strange. Stranger still is that the "interview" with Scalfari is presented on the Vatican website under the category of "speeches!"

Update:

Actually less an "update" than a warm "recommendation." John Allen linked to an interview between Father Thomas Rosica and Monsignor Dario Viganò, the director of Vatican Television. The interview recounts the "transformation" that Viganò discerned in Francis after his moment of prayer before he went on to the Loggia.

But the whole interview is fascinating and Viganò speaks some of the purest Italian I'v heard in a long time (though Rosica is no slouch!). There are English subtitles.

Viganò speaks of the crucial role of images in filming Benedict's departure from the Vatican and Francis' appearance on the Loggia. At the very end he makes, in response to a question, an interesting comparison between the two Popes.

Here are twenty-seven very worthwhile minutes of breaking good.

Rev. Robert P. Imbelli, a priest of the Archdiocese of New York, is Associate Professor of Theology Emeritus at Boston College.

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"Et alibi aliorum ..." (II)

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