Foreign Affairs

Letters | Women, Merton, Presumption

Readers write to petition for women writers, praise Luke Timothy Johnson's essay on Thomas Merton, take issue with Andrew Bacevich, and clarify education goals.

The Catholic Church & Argentina's Dirty War

Gustavo Morello, SJ, offers an incisive and balanced assessment of disparate Catholics and the roles they played in Argentina’s nightmare.


Set in bombed-out Berlin of 1945, Petzold's 'Phoenix' questions who was guilty, and of what, in the daily workings of the Holocaust—and will there be a reckoning?

Letter from Rome: Who Will (& Will Not) Attend the Synod on the Family

Vatican announces who will and will not be attending round two of the Synod; Hungarian cardinal silent on refugee crisis; Heated debates over paving stones in Rome.

Americans & the Needs of Strangers

We should take in refugees because it's the right thing to do, because it’s in keeping with who we say we are, and because we remain a nation that can afford it.

'Small Mercies: A Novel'

Set on present day Staten Island Eddie Joyce's 'Small Mercies' traces the effect of 9/11 on the families of people living in “the servants’ quarters of New York."

Last Word: When in Hebron

In Hebron I learned that the facts on the ground in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict tell a story Americans intent on "international diplomacy" don't want to hear.

Letters | Climate change, Inclusive language, Labour pains, Jewish custom

Readers write in about Catholics breeding like rabbits, writers using "man" to refer to "humanity," the political tsunami in Scotland, and Jewish women cutting hair.

Works of Mercy

Opening our doors to Syrian refugees is the right thing to do and an acknowledgement of the responsibility the United States bears for the chaos in the Middle East.

Another Pope, a Different Cuba

Cuba has changed since the last papal visit. Part of the difference comes from the dramatic shift in the Cuban-U.S. relationship, which Francis helped bring about.

The Arab Had a Name

Narrated by the nameless victim's brother, Kamal Daoud's novel asks: Did Camus intend to use the Algerian murder victim in 'The Stranger' as a disposable prop?

The Barefoot Lawyer

Chen Guangcheng's condemnation of the Chinese state is told through his story of legal activism, resulting torture, trial, house arrest, and an escape to the U.S.
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