Poem | October, Falling

For Jacqueline Cooley, 1944–2018
I kick the leaf piles wind has pre-arranged

Last night the trees changed color while I slept.
One moment at my window: a new world.
Love, do you continue transmuting where you are?

Pandemonium of the color wheel. That raucousness.
Noise the sky can hear I call October falling.
Now, outside, calling you to join me, Love,

I kick the leaf piles wind has pre-arranged.
This is what I want to do with my late seventies,
honor the sky, scatter stained glass on the sidewalk,

follow the path their hues take us, you beside me.
Then, befriend the wind I’d called an enemy,
flatter it a little with the truth.

Wind, you have a longer history than my breath
encircling worlds before they could take shape,
arranging, disarranging, misaligning, to align—

Published in the October 2020 issue: 
Tags

Peter Cooley is Professor Emeritus of English and Director of Creative Writing at Tulane University where he taught from 1975 to 2018. His tenth book of poetry, World Without Finishing, was published by Carnegie Mellon in 2018. He is Poetry editor of Christianity and Literature and was Louisiana Poet Laureate from 2015 to 2017.

Also by this author
Poem | The Instants

Please email comments to [email protected] and join the conversation on our Facebook page.

Must Reads

Collections