Was This the Death Knell of the Two-State Solution?

Secretary of State John Kerry spoke Wednesday, December 28, on the Israeli Occupation of Palestinian territory and the diminishing likelihood of a two-state solution. Here is a transcript of that speech at Vox

I hope you will have had time to read it before commenting. Kerry's last-ditch effort to salvage the two-state solution and the Obama policy on Israel has not been well-received. Perhaps it sounded the death knell of two states for two peoples. Yet, what follows will hardly end the conflict. The snippet I posted struck a point that has always seemed to me to be a major defect in the U.S. support for Israel. Now Kerry said it. Could it shape the thinking of the U.S. Congress, certain Evangelicals, certain American Jewish organizations, and some uncritical Catholics?

Here is the snippet of Kerry's speech:

Regrettably, some seem to believe that the US friendship means the US must accept any policy, regardless of our own interests, our own positions, our own words, our own principles—even after urging again and again that the policy must change. Friends need to tell each other the hard truths, and friendships require mutual respect." Israel’s permanent representative to the United Nations, who does not support a two-state solution, said after the vote last week: “It was to be expected that Israel’s greatest ally would act in accordance with the values that we share” and veto this resolution. I am compelled to respond that the United States, did in fact vote "in accordance with our values," just as previous U.S. administrations have done at the Security Council.

Post your own preferred snippets, comments from elsewhere you found illuminating, and, of course, your always temperate thoughts on the whole subject.

Margaret O'Brien Steinfels, a former editor of Commonweal, writes frequently in these pages.

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