Forget-Me-Not

There are some things we'd rather not remember: old wounds, moral lapses, humiliating failures. But there are also things we have a duty to never forget, like historical traumas and present injustices.

Cultural critic Lewis Hyde explores this tension—how the hard work of "forgetting" can pave the way to healing and regeneration, touching on Buddhist philosophy, St. Augustine, and Marcel Proust.

Plus, the editors challenge the US Bishops to stop mincing words and take concrete action on immigration.

In forgetfulness lies the liquefaction of time. That is, temporality flows again when we can forget

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