dotCommonweal

A blog by the magazine's editors and contributors

.

Signs of Life...

Since I recently questioned the consistency of Notre Dame's policy on contraception and the paucity of parental benefits offered by the University to its employees, I thought it appropriate to share this most recent email message from President Jenkins to the ND community:

On campus, I have recently formed the Task Force on Supporting the Choice for Life. It will be co-chaired by Professor Margaret Brinig, the Fritz Duda Family Chair in Law and Associate Dean for the Law School, and by Professor John Cavadini, the Chair of the Department of Theology and the McGrath-Cavadini Director of the Institute for Church Life. My charge to the Task Force is to consider and recommend to me ways in which the University, informed by Catholic teaching, can support the sanctity of life. Possibilities the Task Force has begun to discuss include fostering serious and specific discussion about a reasonable conscience clause; the most effective ways to support pregnant women, especially the most vulnerable; and the best policies for facilitating adoptions. Such initiatives are in addition to the dedication, hard work and leadership shown by so many in the Notre Dame Family, both on the campus and beyond, and the Task Force may also be able to recommend ways we can support some of this work.

Jenkins presents this initiative as fruit of the dialogue that took place on campus surrounding Obama's commencement speech last spring. It will be interesting to see what the task force comes up with.By request, read the whole thing after the jump...

Dear Members of the Notre Dame Family,Coming out of the vigorous discussions surrounding President Obamas visit last Spring, I said we would look for ways to engage the Notre Dame community with the issues raised in a prayerful and meaningful way. As our nation continues to struggle with the morality and legality of abortion, embryonic stem cell research, and related issues, we must seek steps to witness to the sanctity of life. I write to you today about some initiatives that we are undertaking.Each year on January 22, the anniversary of the Supreme Courts Roe v. Wade decision, the March for Life is held in Washington D.C. to call on the nation to defend the right to life. I plan to participate in that march. I invite other members of the Notre Dame Family to join me and I hope we can gather for a Mass for Life at that event. We will announce details as that date approaches.On campus, I have recently formed the Task Force on Supporting the Choice for Life. It will be co-chaired by Professor Margaret Brinig, the Fritz Duda Family Chair in Law and Associate Dean for the Law School, and by Professor John Cavadini, the Chair of the Department of Theology and the McGrath-Cavadini Director of the Institute for Church Life. My charge to the Task Force is to consider and recommend to me ways in which the University, informed by Catholic teaching, can support the sanctity of life. Possibilities the Task Force has begun to discuss include fostering serious and specific discussion about a reasonable conscience clause; the most effective ways to support pregnant women, especially the most vulnerable; and the best policies for facilitating adoptions. Such initiatives are in addition to the dedication, hard work and leadership shown by so many in the Notre Dame Family, both on the campus and beyond, and the Task Force may also be able to recommend ways we can support some of this work.I also call to your attention the heroic and effective work of centers that provide care and support for women with unintended pregnancies. The Womens Care Center, the nations largest Catholic-based pregnancy resource center, on whose Foundation Board I serve, is run by a Notre Dame graduate, Ann Murphy Manion (77). The center has proven successful in offering professional, non-judgmental concern to women with unintended pregnancies, helping those women through their pregnancy and supporting them after the birth of their child. The Womens Care Center and similar centers in other cities deserve the support of Notre Dame clubs and individuals.Our Commencement last Spring generated passionate discussion and also caused some divisions in the Notre Dame community. Regardless of what you think about that event, I hope that we can overcome divisions to foster constructive dialogue and work together for a cause that is at the heart of Notre Dames mission. We will keep you informed of our work, and we ask for your support, assistance and prayers. May Our Lady, Notre Dame, watch over our efforts.In Notre Dame,Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C.

Comments

Commenting Guidelines

Notably, the list of action items does not include strategic dialogue with the Democratic National Committee regarding its whole-hearted endorsement of pro-choice candidates and legislation.

Eric--Possible to provide a link to the full text of the email? I've seen the email in its entirety because it was forwarded to me by family members who are part of the "Notre Dame Family" to whom the email was addressed. IMO, Fr. Jenkins says several other things that are also interesting.Thx.

For anyone who is interested. here is the letter from Fr. Jenkins that I received today.Dear Members of the Notre Dame Family,Coming out of the vigorous discussions surrounding President Obamas visit last spring, I said we would look for ways to engage the Notre Dame community with the issues raised in a prayerful and meaningful way. As our nation continues to struggle with the morality and legality of abortion, embryonic stem cell research, and related issues, we must seek steps to witness to the sanctity of life. I write to you today about some initiatives that we are undertaking.Each year on January 22, the anniversary of the Supreme Courts Roe v. Wade decision, the March for Life is held in Washington D.C. to call on the nation to defend the right to life. I plan to participate in that march. I invite other members of the Notre Dame Family to join me and I hope we can gather for a Mass for Life at that event. We will announce details as that date approaches.On campus, I have recently formed the Task Force on Supporting the Choice for Life. It will be co-chaired by Professor Margaret Brinig, the Fritz Duda Family Chair in Law and Associate Dean for the Law School, and by Professor John Cavadini, the Chair of the Department of Theology and the McGrath-Cavadini Director of the Institute for Church Life. My charge to the Task Force is to consider and recommend to me ways in which the University, informed by Catholic teaching, can support the sanctity of life. Possibilities the Task Force has begun to discuss include fostering serious and specific discussion about a reasonable conscience clause; the most effective ways to support pregnant women, especially the most vulnerable; and the best policies for facilitating adoptions. Such initiatives are in addition to the dedication, hard work and leadership shown by so many in the Notre Dame Family, both on the campus and beyond, and the Task Force may also be able to recommend ways we can support some of this work. I also call to your attention the heroic and effective work of centers that provide care and support for women with unintended pregnancies. The Womens Care Center, the nations largest Catholic-based pregnancy resource center, on whose Foundation Board I serve, is run by a Notre Dame graduate, Ann Murphy Manion (77). The center has proven successful in offering professional, non-judgmental concern to women with unintended pregnancies, helping those women through their pregnancy and supporting them after the birth of their child. The Womens Care Center and similar centers in other cities deserve the support of Notre Dame clubs and individuals.Our Commencement last spring generated passionate discussion and also caused some divisions in the Notre Dame community. Regardless of what you think about that event, I hope that we can overcome divisions to foster constructive dialogue and work together for a cause that is at the heart of Notre Dames mission. We will keep you informed of our work, and we ask for your support, assistance and prayers. May Our Lady, Notre Dame, watch over our efforts.In Notre Dame,Rev. John Jenkins, C.S.C.

F.Y.I. http://ethicscenter.nd.edu/lifefund.shtmlNo doubt, this Fund has the potential to be a "Beacon of Light", as we work together to protect the Sanctity and Dignity of every Human Life which is a Gift from God to begin with.

Clarification of these issues both within the church and publicly from the church are definitly due. Notre Dame seems to be one of the best places to deal with these issues and develop "policy".

Denise, I agree. Regardless of their good intentions, it is time to revisit the "Nature of the Mandatum", http://www.usccb.org/bishops/mandatumguidelines.shtml, beginning with #3 which states that the mandatum is not actually a mandatum since " Theologians who have received a mandatum are not catechists; they teach in their own name in virtue of their baptism and their academic and professional competence, not in the name of the bishop or the Church's Magisterium..." AND to revisit "The Land of Lakes Statement", which states, " To perform its teaching and research functions effectively, the Catholic University must have a true autonomy and academic freedom in the face of authority of whatever kind, lay or clerical, external to the academic community itself...", which we all know is not true since, in order to be Catholic, one must be in communion with the Catholic Church to begin with.

What needs to be revisited is the etire relationship of Church leadership to theologians in the current "impasse."Obviously, some think their revisitation means they have it all figured ou talready.But, good for ND.

Bob, that does not change the fact that an "autonomous Catholic" would be an oxymoron to begin with.

Nancy - "autonomous Catholic" - guess it depends upon how you define autonomous.Here is a quote from a Texas workshop by B16:Presented at the 10th Workshop for BishopsFebruary 1991, Dallas, Texas.Morality of conscience and morality of authority as two opposing models, appear to be locked in struggle with each other. Accordingly, the freedom of the Christian would be rescued by appeal to the classical principle of moral tradition that conscience is the highest norm which man is to follow even in opposiotion to authority.Authority, in this case the Magisterium, may well speak of matters moral, but only in the sense of presenting conscience with material for its own deliberation. Conscience would retain, however, the final word

Bill --Is that quote from the workshop or from B16? I wouldn't expect him to say that the Magisterium only presents material for "deliberation". And is the quote about the consciences of theologians only?Again, we need a theological epistemology.

Direct quote from Cardinal Ratzinger, then head of the CDF.