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Ten Commandments of Driving

Hot off the presses, here's the Vatican's newly released discussion of the "moral aspects of driving."  Here are it's Ten Commandments for drivers:

I.

 You shall not kill.

II.

The road shall be for you a means of communion between people and not of mortal harm.

III.

 Courtesy, uprightness and prudence will help you deal with unforeseen events.

IV.

  Be charitable and help your neighbour in need, especially victims of accidents.

V.

Cars shall not be for you an expression of power and domination, and an occasion of sin.

VI.

Charitably convince the young and not so young not to drive when they are not in a fitting condition to do so.

VII.

Support the families of accident victims.

VIII.

Bring guilty motorists and their victims together, at the appropriate time, so that they can undergo the liberating experience of forgiveness.

IX.

On the road, protect the more vulnerable party.

X.

Feel responsible towards others.

My question for the discussion thread:  On these principles, is driving an SUV a sin?  (See, in this regard, Commandments I, II, V, IX, and X)

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Just to be clear, Stuart -- I don't have any objection to your participation in the conversation. In fact, I think that you often make very good and interesting points, even when I find myself disagreeing with you. My question is more one of style -- why do you so frequently (as in this case; see, for example, your comment at 2:14 on June 20) frame your comments as assaults on the good faith or authentic Catholicism of your interlocutors? It often, as in this thread, seems unnecessary to the substance of your point, and it simply makes it harder for people to engage with you in a thoughtful way.

Eduardo -- yes, you posed a question. But based on knowledge of your political positions, the question didn't seem likely to be totally open-ended; rather, it seemed to be asked with a particular answer in mind. If that's not what you intended, then I leaped to the wrong conclusion. "why do you so frequently (as in this case; see, for example, your comment at 2:14 on June 20) frame your comments as assaults on the good faith or authentic Catholicism of your interlocutors?"Fair enough, although again, everyone seems to do this. The post here was framed as a question about the authentic Catholicism of an entire class of people. So what you perceive as an "assault," I perceived as consistent with the terms of the discussion. [Hmm -- maybe there's a case study here in differing perceptions and miscommunications. You perceive an innocent question in your post; I perceive an implicit accusation of sin. You perceive an "assault"; I perceive an instance of turnabout is fair play.]

In the several times since this was reported no one has commented on the rest of the story. The Drivers' Commandments are a small section of a larger document: "Guidelines for the Pastoral Care of the Road". Part 1 is about drivers.Parts 2-4 are about people on the side of the road -- prostitutes and the homeless. See the link below:http://212.77.1.245/news_services/bulletin/news/20451.php?index=20451&po...

Just keep in mind, your loved once is waiting for you at home. - http://www.defensivedrivingcompanyofamerica.com/

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About the Author

Eduardo Moisés Peñalver is the John P. Wilson Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. He is the author of numerous books and articles on the subjects of property and land use law.