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Notes of a Future Pope

The Archbishop of Havana, cum permissu superiorum, has published notes of the talk given by then Cardinal Bergoglio during the pre-Conclave meetings of the Cardinals. Here are two of ths points he made:

When the Church is self-referent without realizing it, she believes she has her own light. She ceases to be the mysterium lunae and gives way to that very great evil which is spiritual worldliness (according to De Lubac, it is the worst evil that can come upon the Church). The self-referent Church lives to give glory only to one another. In simple terms, there are two images of the Church: the evangelizing Church that comes out of herself; the Dei Verbum religiose audiens et fidente proclamans,and the worldly Church that lives within herself, of herself, for herself. This must give light to the possible changes and reforms which must be made for the salvation of souls.Thinking of the next Pope, he must be a man that from the contemplation and adoration of Jesus Christ, helps the Church to come out to the existential peripheries, that helps her to be the fruitful mother who lives from the sweet and comforting joy of evangelizing.

The rest is here.Update:Here is part of L'Osservatore Romano's summary of Francis' General Audience today:

God did not wait for us to approach him. Rather, it was he who moved toward us, without calculation or quantification. Hence the invitation to rediscover Holy Week as an opportunity to learn once again to follow, to accompany Christ. Even if this demands that we first come out of ourselves, come out of a dreary way of living faith that has become a habit, he warned. To come out of the temptation to close ourselves into our own plans, which ends by closing our horizons to God's creative action. We should therefore continue to follow the Lord with courage, carrying within us a ray of his love to all those we meet: this is what living Holy Week means."

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Yes, yes, yes and yes.1- "The Church is called to come out of herself and to go to the peripheries not only in the geographic sense but also the existential peripheries: those of the mystery of sin, of pain, of injustice, of ignorance..." 2- The evils that over the course of time happen in ecclesial institutions have their root in a self-reference and a sort of theological narcissism" (and a self-protective clerical narcissism?)3- The self-referent Church lives to give glory only to one anotherthe worldly Church that lives within herself, of herself, for herself...(hierarchy refusing to own its complicity in criminal child endangerment)4- Thinking of the next Pope, he must be a man that from the contemplation and adoration of Jesus Christ, helps the Church to come out to the existential peripheries(where abuse survivors are among the crowd)

Correction to #3 and #4 above to clarify with close quotes where Cd Bergoglio's words end:#3 "of herself, for herself"#4 "existential peripheries"Parens are my comments, of course. Sorry, if any confusion.

In that same talk, Cardinal Bergoglio also said this:

The evils that over the course of time happen in ecclesial institutions have their root in a self-reference and a sort of theological narcissism. . . . The Church is called to come out of herself and to go to the peripheries not only in the geographic sense but also the existential peripheries: those of the mystery of sin, of pain, of injustice, of ignorance, . . . and of all misery.

I think theres common ground between his call and Bonhoeffers: that we must

liv[e] unreservedly in lifes duties, problems, successes and failures, experiences and perplexities. In so doing we throw ourselves completely into the arms of God, taking seriously, not our own sufferings, but those of God in the world . . . . That, I think, is faith, that is metanoia: and that is how one becomes a [person] and a Christian.(Letters and Papers from Prison)

Right after posting the above, I took an early evening walk and was confronted by the rising full moon, the herald of Easter hope. It made Cardinal Bergoglio's reference to the Church as the "mysterium lunae" all the more vivid. A prayer for this Holy Triduum: that we, the Church, may be ever more a full moon, allowing the sun who is Christ to be reflected in us.

Thank you for posting this. I cannot help but connect some of the arresting imagery here with the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius Loyola, about which we spoke in an earlier thread.The image of Jesus standing at the door and knocking, for instance. I would bet you anything that this wonderful concept of Jesus knocking TO BE LET OUT comes from praying with that scripture text imaginatively. Also, the discernment between two ways: classic. I am much encouraged, not only by these thoughts as they reflect the new Pope's mind, but also that these remarks may have been instrumental in the decision of the conclave, showing that they too were impressed and wanted a leader with who would bring the Church out to the peripheries.Robert, I am not familiar with "mysterium lunae" as a term. Where does it come from? Do you know the source?

Rita,I know that the metaphor was used by the fathers of the Church, but have no quote directly to hand. But here is what John Paul II wrote in "Novo Millennio Ineunte:""A new century, a new millennium are opening in the light of Christ. But not everyone can see this light. Ours is the wonderful and demanding task of becoming its reflection. This is the mysterium lunae, which was so much a part of the contemplation of the Fathers of the Church, who employed this image to show the Churchs dependence on Christ, the Sun whose light she reflects."

Francis has a master's degree in chemistry, and I've noticed that this short sermon (and others) draws not only on the languages of the Humanities (see the "existential peripheries") but also on the language of the sciences, e.g., "self-referential" (a term from logic and semantics), and "calculation and quantification" from math. He doesn't hesitate to use scientific concepts. Yet he is well aware of the "existential peripheries". It seems that he is also the first pope to have a really good education in both the sciences and the Humanities, a point which might have far-reaching effects in his consideration of the hot button issues facing the Church..Look at it this way: if he ever feels obligated to focus on the hot button moral issues his appreciation of scientific method might incline him to look carefully at the new relevant evidence concerning these issues, and he might be inclined to think critically about the old arguments when he draws his conclusions. (A girl can dream, can't she?)

La Stampa quotes another part of Frances' talk today:"Dear Arab speaking pilgrims and pilgrims from the Middle East: do not be afraid to follow the crucified and resurrected Jesus with courage, bringing joy and the light of your faith to everyone,"I don't remember another pope referring to another faith as bringing light to *everyone*. In other words, all faiths have something to offer each other. Another first?

Anne,I think you are misinterpreting Francis's words: Dear Arab speaking pilgrims and pilgrims from the Middle East: do not be afraid to follow the crucified and resurrected Jesus with courage, bringing joy and the light of your faith to everyone, He is not referring to Islam -- which denies the reality of the crucifixion and the resurrection of Jesus. You're forgetting (as we Western Christians so often do) that there are ARAB CHRISTIANS, whose following of Jesus often calls for a courage we can barely imagine. The reflections for the Stations of the Cross in Rome tomorrow night were written by some of them.

Katherine --Yes, I see now that your interpretation is correct. Thanks.