dotCommonweal

A blog by the magazine's editors and contributors

.

A Christmas Prayer for Peace

From Pope Benedict's Homily in Saint Peter's Basilica last night:

So Christ is our peace, and he proclaimed peace to those far away and to those near at hand (cf. Eph 2:14, 17). How could we now do other than pray to him: Yes, Lord, proclaim peace today to us too, whether we are far away or near at hand. Grant also to us today that swords may be turned into ploughshares (Is 2:4), that instead of weapons for warfare, practical aid may be given to the suffering. Enlighten those who think they have to practice violence in your name, so that they may see the senselessness of violence and learn to recognize your true face. Help us to become people with whom you are pleased people according to your image and thus people of peace.

The full homily is here.

About the Author

Rev. Robert P. Imbelli, a priest of the Archdiocese of New York, is Associate Professor of Theology Emeritus at Boston College.

2 comments
Close

2 comments

Commenting Guidelines

  • All

Other portions of the speech."The great moral question of our attitude towards the homeless, towards refugees and migrants, takes on a deeper dimension: do we really have room for God when he seeks to enter under our roof?......We are so full of ourselves that there is no room left for God. And that means there is no room for others either, for children, for the poor, for the stranger....Now it is true that in the course of history, monotheism has served as a pretext for intolerance and violence. It is true that religion can become corrupted and hence opposed to its deepest essence, when people think they have to take Gods cause into their own hands, making God into their private property. We must be on the lookout for these distortions of the sacred.....Enlighten those who think they have to practise violence in your name, so that they may see the senselessness of violence and learn to recognize your true face..... that Christians and Muslims may build up their countries side by side in Gods peace."Hope you are listening Fox News and other laissez faire market enthusiasts and theocrats.

I also found this portion of the Pope's homily very powerful:"The great moral question of our attitude towards the homeless, towards refugees and migrants, takes on a deeper dimension: do we really have room for God when he seeks to enter under our roof? Do we have time and space for him? Do we not actually turn away God himself? We begin to do so when we have no time for God. The faster we can move, the more efficient our time-saving appliances become, the less time we have. And God? The question of God never seems urgent. Our time is already completely full. But matters go deeper still. Does God actually have a place in our thinking? Our process of thinking is structured in such a way that he simply ought not to exist. Even if he seems to knock at the door of our thinking, he has to be explained away. If thinking is to be taken seriously, it must be structured in such a way that the God hypothesis becomes superfluous. There is no room for him. Not even in our feelings and desires is there any room for him. We want ourselves. We want what we can seize hold of, we want happiness that is within our reach, we want our plans and purposes to succeed. We are so 'full' of ourselves that there is no room left for God. And that means there is no room for others either, for children, for the poor, for the stranger."But cutting against the grain of the no-time-for-God theme of the homily is this wonderful story I saw today at CNN about a group of Franciscan nuns in Wisconsin who have been engaged in continuous Perpetual Adoration for 134 years (and counting)http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-901505?hpt=hp_bn1

Add new comment

You may login with your assigned e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.

Or log in with...

Add new comment