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Kindlers rejoice.

Commonweal is now available on the Amazon Kindle (and its mobile apps) for the low low price of $2.99 a month. Click here to subscribe. Do it for the trees.

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Just subscribed on my husband's Kindle.

I'm afraid this is totally off topic, and if so you have my permission to zap it. But having resisted Kindle for the last few years, I'm beginning to feel the urge to succumb. The Amazon website, however, seems to be the last place on earth where one would go to learn what differentiates the various models. Any advice about what to buy cheerfully accepted.

Actually, Nick, my advice is to wait it out. Amazon is supposed to release an updated Kindle in the near future.

Why pay $36 for that rather than $34 for an online subscription, which isn't limited to mobile devices?Not criticizing - just curious.

Amazon sets the price. One reason you might want to pay for a Kindle subscription is that it updates wirelessly--anywhere, if you have the right model--and once the latest issue downloads to your device (whether to the Kindle itself or via Amazon's iPhone, iPad, or Android apps) you can take it wherever you'd like. Or you might have a Kindle already, and would like to be able to carry your books and magazines on one device.

Nicholas Clifford: I like CNET for electronics reviews, they rate the various e-book readers. http://reviews.cnet.com/e-book-readers/?tag=snav;snavI'm feeling a little irked with Kindle right now. I can't get e-books from the NY Public Library with a Kindle; I could if I had a Nook, or a Sony or a Kobo...

I still prefer the stone tablet method of publication.

yOU CAN'T GIVE YOUR KINDLE EDITION TO SOMeone WHO CAN'T AFFORD EITHER THE PAPER OR A KINDLE. Sorry for the caps.

I love my Kindle to carry around in my backpack, but when I buy a Kindle book, I am much more likely to have it sent to my iPad. Of course, the Kindle is far less expensive.

Our living room would not feel like home without a basket full of Commoneals. Americas, and a heap of NCRs. And I'm with Mary Bergan about the ability to hand one of these on to someone else when the spirit moves....

On the other hand, if this is a good deal for Commonweal financially becaue you don't have to print and mail maybe it would be possible to make an attractive special offer to college students, those valued future readers who are so focused on electronic devices.

If you have a paid up DTB Commonweal subscription, will you be able to access the Kindle copy? Kindle users use DTB (dead tree books) to refer to printed material.Other magazines/newspapers seem to work this way.

Do Kindles have web browsers?

There are some high quality color pictures in the print edition; do you get them with the kindle subscription?

The Kindle doesn't have color yet, Mark. Sixteen shades of gray. Color's apparently coming for Christmas.I think tablets have found such popularity because they feel so natural - they're a perfect fit for the human hand. I think the old typewriter model of PC is eventually going to disappear; it's lasted far too long. Kindles, Nooks, and the rest are a niche product that will eventually disappear, I think, as tablet computers become lighter and cheaper. (The iPad is already light and inexpensive enough for me (except for reading in bed - that's where the iPod comes in) but I understand the attraction of the non-computer reader - it's cheaper and lighter.)It looks as though Commonweal's just dipping its toe cautiously into the world of mobile readers. This is probably as far as Grant and Friends could convince them to go at the moment :O)

No to go Michelle Bachmann here, but if you are prone to migraines or digital eye strain (aka CVS), I suggest trying out someone else's Kindle (Nook, whatever) before purchasing one. I can't use them.

Interesting, Jean. No problem with the LCD screen on your computer?Here's something on that:http://www.pixelandmatter.com/2010/01/21/e-ink-is-dead-long-live-e-ink/

I just find it awesome to order a book and have it in seconds. It really is something. I like the search engine--fabulous. My biggest objection was that you cannot copy and paste--now you can. One reservation that remains is that it does not stare you in the face every day like a paged book saying "finish me." At any rate we are living in awesome times.

Can Mollie or someone tell us why her thread on nuns was closed without explanation?

Since I stopped paying for airmail service to my Canadian address because it kept getting sidetracked I have taken to using my access to the Commonweal website version to create my own PDF copy, full color and placing it on my iPad for easy transport anywhere including in bed with the lights out, Jean. Thanks Grant for the e-mail notice of publication.It takes about 30 minutes to do but it beats the postal service all to heck. I just still want a printed copy to add to my collection. You can't believe how terrible the postal service has become. I got the July issue late and the next day I received both of the June issues. I'm still waiting for the August issue, which I have already read.

Bill Mazzella (8/22 10:35 pm):

Can Mollie or someone tell us why her thread on nuns was closed without explanation?

Yes, I was curious about that, too.

John Borst: The Postal Service (US variety) may soon be defunct, so Kindle etc will be it.

Congratulations on the Kindle access. If you really want to surge forward in digital publishing you need an iPad/iPhone/iPodTouch app: http://money.cnn.com/2011/08/22/technology/ipad_forever/

I join those in expressing perplexity as to why the welcome thread on the fading presence of Sisters in Catholic hospitals was ended. I was hoping more would be said, without acrimony, and frankly some of it quite quirky ("the third way"), to honor the essential role that women religious have had in the building of the Church in this country. American Catholic history is more and more, it seems to me, ignored. John Tracy Ellis would be greatly disappointed. The story of the decline of the number of women religious in the United States, Canada, and Europe, and increasingly now in countries such as India, needs far more analysis than a combox can provide. Yet some more sympathetic and deeper reflection would, I think, have been both possible and helpful.I tried to link on Sunday, most unsuccessfully, to the renowned Australian photographer, David Moore's (d. 2003) masterful photograph, "Sisters [Daughters} of Charity, Washington, D.C., 1956." For those interested, you need only key in artist and title. I am fortunate to have a signed copy, and it gives me daily inspiration, and at least a bit of calm.Father Joe Komonchak referred to the Daughters of Charity's Providence Hospital, Washington, D,C, and the care that it provides to the poor in the city, and has since 1860. Full disclosure: my aunt and godmother, one of the most warm, approachable, caring human beings one could ever meet, was a Daughter from age seventeen until her death from cancer at sixty-nine in 1995. She was then vice-president for Mission and Ministry at De Paul Hospital, Norfolk, and sister servant (superior) to the thirteen-member community."In the time of their visitation they shall shine, and shall dart about as sparks through stubble."(I took a vow not to comment on dotCommonweal until at least 8 September. Ah well, it was only a private one.)

To Grant Gallicho: Does it include access to the archives? The old ones? (It would be convenient to be able to read an entire old issue, not just one article.)-----To John Page: Why did you consider it "quite quirky" to mention the third way in a thread about the exodus from religious life? Many (most) nuns entered convents right out of high school. Many of the priests entered seminarians right out of high school, some just out of grade school. Not to understand that or to condemn them for realizing, in their twenties, that they were sexual beings is strange. Here are a few million leads to the third way. http://tinyurl.com/3krm7b9You'll notice on the first Google page that the term was invented by Teilhard de Chardin and has been written about by Sipe, Cozzens, et al.

I don't own a Kindle. But you can read all about it on the Internets:http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004HFS6Z0/ref=kindlesu-1Think of the Kindle as a home for print publications. As far as I know, there's no archive of magazines you haven't already downloaded. We're looking into the possibility of linking Kindle subscriptions with commonwealmagazine.org subscriptions. At this point, I'm not sure Amazon offers that feature to small publications like ours. Speaking of: when we win the lottery we'll commission an iOS app.(I don't want to moderate a discussion about women religious here, so please don't post about it.)

John, glad the iPad works for you. I use special glasses for computer work, but I have to take frequent breaks. As I head toward retirement, I'm thinking about how "plugged in" I want to be when these things are no longer required for my job.I haven't been able to get up a decent euchre game since my Uncle Dick died several years ago. My son suggested I play online. It was awful. Every was over in about 60 seconds. There was no interaction, no table talking, no ribbing the other players, no gloating, no arguments, no wagers, and the way the cards were dealt was more or less like a strobe action. After two rounds, I ditched it.Clearly, the Lord is calling me to a nursing home where some old geezers would love to get up a game. Hell, I'll even bring the Molson's if the nurses let me ...

"DTB (dead tree books)"I must say, I'm impressed by how widespread Kindle adoption is, if the comments on this thread are any indication of its popularity. Probably, it really is saving some trees. How many years away are we from being told that reforestation is becoming a problem? :-) (Kind of like Canada geese, a protected species, are in my area!)

Jean Raber (8/23 10:53 am):

I use special glasses for computer work, but I have to take frequent breaks. As I head toward retirement, Im thinking about how plugged in I want to be when these things are no longer required for my job.

Jean, don't think of it as "being plugged in" but as simply another way of reading. If the Kindle moves away from e-ink in order to get color, you may find it bearable. And the new iPad - due out in maybe six months - is forecast to have a screen with much higher definition than it has now (although I find the present definition fine). That might also help. Stop by an Apple store and have a look when it's available.

I havent been able to get up a decent euchre game since my Uncle Dick died several years ago. My son suggested I play online. It was awful. Every was over in about 60 seconds. There was no interaction, no table talking, no ribbing the other players, no gloating, no arguments, no wagers, and the way the cards were dealt was more or less like a strobe action. After two rounds, I ditched it.

I know what you mean. Online game playing still has a very long way to go before the human factor becomes integrated satisfactorily. I think there are still formidable technical obstacles to overcome. We'll need much faster and more reliable broadband and, I'd guess, much faster and more powerful little computers. Probably not in our lifetimes.

"I join those in expressing perplexity as to why the welcome thread on the fading presence of Sisters in Catholic hospitals was ended."John, she also shut down her post on Jane Austen over on Verdicts. For lack of a better forum to offer this comment, let me say that I dislike the fact that anybody can get access to poster e-mails by clicking their names, while clicking the bloggers' names just leads to a bio.I would prefer not to have my e-mail appear to all and sundry; it leads to a lot of unwanted flames.

A word to the perplexed: I'm on maternity leave and (mostly) away from my computer these days. I hope to be able to write posts now and then, and I'm happy to hear feedback, but but I can't promise I'll have the time to monitor comments indefinitely or provide an open-ended discussion "thread." (For what it's worth, you can find my email address in my contributor's bio.)

Grant, how many sales have you had so far?