Book Reviews

Faith-Based Persecution

Though the number of Christians killed and persecuted every year is contested, Shortt clears away misconceptions that other religions are the source of the problem.

The Byron of Our Time

A new biography on Sir Patrick Leigh Fermor, who achieved three impressive goals in travel, war, and art.

Roth at Rest

Pierpont presents a picture of Philip Roth’s works that contains necessary qualifications: there is no dutiful approval of every word the master has written.

Various but Coherent

Evangelicalism is still very much around, and understanding such a diverse movement is a formidable challenge. Molly Worthen is to be commended for helping meet it.

Hauerwas on Hauerwas

Hauerwas divides Approaching the End into three parts dealing respectively with eschatology, the church, and what he calls “the difficulty of reality.”

Romance & Resurrection

Boitani addresses not the question of whether Shakespeare was Catholic, but a more basic one: Was he in any important sense a Christian poet?

Making Do

The men who tell their stories in 'Doing the Best I Can: Fatherhood in the Inner City' know that they don’t look much like Ward Cleaver or Cliff Huxtable.

He Is Who Is

One of David Bentley Hart's deeper points is that the major theistic religions do indeed have something in common when they say “God.”

Dworkin’s Jisei

'Religion Without God' is a lovely swan song. It is short—it’s based on the Einstein Lectures delivered at the University of Bern in 2011—but eloquent and rich.

Beyond the Cloister

Williams astutely alerts us to Evdokimov’s proposition that the vows of a religious are analogous to Christ’s response to the temptations in the desert.

When Martyrdom Isn’t a Metaphor

Not many Christians in the West are aware that in many parts of the world Christians still risk their lives just by going to church to celebrate the birth of Christ.

Grief Detained

Barnes's broodings are intelligent, often eloquent, and just to the elegiac occasion. But Barnes is also sometimes hard.