Book Reviews

American Reckoning

Appy’s view is that American exceptionalism is an obnoxious and dangerous delusion, and his broadside against it recounts a litany of Vietnam atrocities.

Hitler's First Victims

This story is fascinating in its own right, but what makes the shootings of these four Jews a worthy subject of Timothy Ryback's arresting new book is their timing.

No Turning Back

Published posthumously, Margaret O'Gara's collection of essays introduces the ecumenical perspective to a general audience in vivid first person.

A Backpack, a Bear, and Eight Crates of Vodka

The humorous tone of Lev Golinkin’s new memoir doesn’t prevent him from engaging with topics of deadly importance: tryanny, communism, anti-Semitism, and childhood.

The Future of the Catholic Church with Pope Francis

Readers expecting a tour de force of church history shouldn't. The question for Wills is this: Why do we need the church or Pope Francis to remind us of God’s love?

Diary of the Fall

Through the eyes of a middle-aged alcoholic grandson of an Auschwitz survivor, Michel Raub's fifth novel contemplates the infinite ways humans torment each other.

Distant Neighbors

Wendell Berry and Gary Snyder's correspondence narrates the tension between a place-based way of life and the travel schedule of a prominent writer, beautifully.

No Man's Land

Samet’s memoir has a bone to pick with American society and the Army itself—both, she believes, failed her former West Point cadets, soldiers who never returned.

In Paradise: A Novel

In Matthiessen's final book, a professor spends a week at Auschwitz with aggrieved Jews, guilt-ridden Christians, observant Buddhists, and analytical secularists.

Transformative Experience

If you can’t choose to have a child the way you choose dessert, how can you choose rationally? L.A. Paul reveals the problem of foresight and modern decision-making.

Herzl's Vision

Tracing the political thought of Israel's founding father, Shlomo Avineri reminds readers that the Zionism of Herzl's time is very different from Zionism today.

At Home in Exile

Alan Wolfe is pessimistic about the future of Canadian Jewry, but Tzvi Novick is pessimistic about Alan Wolfe's universalism.